A Murder in Klondike

Many immigrants arrived in Tuscarawas County at the turn of the 20th century to work in the industries that dominated the local economy at the time. Among them were coal miners who came to work the county’s numerous coal mines, leading to the creation of “company towns” like Klondike. Many of the stories of theseContinue reading “A Murder in Klondike”

Decapitated and Burned: Explosion at the Stone House Mine

Recently I posted an image of a Bureau of Mines Mine Rescue Car that visited the mining town of Roswell in 1923. That image, and a comment from someone who saw it, led me to examine a tragic incident from 1927 that occurred at a local Tuscarawas County coal mine outside of Mineral City. TwoContinue reading “Decapitated and Burned: Explosion at the Stone House Mine”

Mine Rescue Car Visits Roswell

My neighbor gave me a panoramic image taken in December 1923 titled “Department of Interior, Bureau of Mines, Car #5, at Roswell, Ohio, December 1923” that shows the miners of that community and even lists some of their names. Recognize anyone? During the first few decades of the 20th century nearly a million people workedContinue reading “Mine Rescue Car Visits Roswell”

“Murder in Colorado”: The Death of Dyas Mills

After the death of their father two brothers made the move from Tuscarawas County to the Great Plains. One of those brothers would lose his life at the hands of another man on New Years Eve in a remote town in the middle of the Colorado Territory. Jonathan Winn Mills (1813-1869) was born in VirginiaContinue reading ““Murder in Colorado”: The Death of Dyas Mills”

One House’s Story: The Hoobler Family

I have wanted to explore the history of this house for a while because this house is so hard to miss when you are driving on North Broadway in New Philadelphia. I knew it had to have at least one good story worth telling and I was not incorrect. A note about addresses: House numbersContinue reading “One House’s Story: The Hoobler Family”

One House’s Story: The Hay Family

There are many houses that get swallowed up by future construction and changes in how a property is used. I only recently learned that this building on the corner of Fair Avenue and Broadway has, at its core, a home built by a 19th century New Philadelphia merchant. A note about addresses: House numbers andContinue reading “One House’s Story: The Hay Family”

One House’s Story: The Schauffler Family

Two immigrant brothers arrived in New Philadelphia in the late 1870s and, before too long, operated one of the largest tanneries in Tuscarawas County. One of those brothers built a home on the fringe of downtown New Philadelphia, a home his family would live in for over forty years. A note: House numbers and streetContinue reading “One House’s Story: The Schauffler Family”

One House’s Story: The Wallace Family

This house rests in an area that was considered, at the time it was built, as the outskirts of the city of New Philadelphia. Today, however, it sits at one of the busiest intersections on the west end of the city and is seen by countless passersby. This is one of its stories. A noteContinue reading “One House’s Story: The Wallace Family”

One House’s Story: The Tidrick Family

Don’t let the modern appearance of any home fool you. Every home, regardless of condition or modern use, has a story to tell. This is the story of a house that has seen better days but deserves to have its story told nonetheless. A note about addresses: House numbers and street names often change overContinue reading “One House’s Story: The Tidrick Family”

One House’s Story: The Rumbaugh Family

There are so many homes in downtown areas that are either torn down to make room for new construction or are converted to other uses. In some cases, the original fabric and style of the home call out to those willing to learn about their earlier lives. A note about addresses: House numbers and streetContinue reading “One House’s Story: The Rumbaugh Family”